— Murray Lab —

Project Leader, Murray Lab

Jeremy Murray

Project Leader, Murray Lab

Jeremy Murray is intrigued by the way that legumes (e.g. beans and peas) and bacteria in the soil have a mutually beneficial relationship – a symbiosis.

He studies the interaction and communication between plants and their associated bacteria. He recognises that optimising symbiosis can have dramatic impacts on the growth and health of legume plants with implications for future yields, especially in areas where artificial fertiliser is unavailable or environmentally unwanted.

Jeremy was the second internal candidate to join CEPAMS in Shanghai from the John Innes Centre in 2017.

He is originally from Canada and has also worked in the US at the Noble Foundation.

Legume Symbiosis with Rhizobia

Legume Symbiosis with Rhizobia

Investigating the symbiotic interaction between rhizobia and legumes which is called nodulation

Selecting the Appropriate Symbiont

Selecting the Appropriate Symbiont

How the plant host can select the appropriate symbiont from such a vast ocean of bacteria

Models for Symbiotic Development

Models for Symbiotic Development

Using transcription factor mutants and single cell transcriptomics we have drawn the first clear infection thread gene regulatory networks